01

THE SERIES

Coextinction explores the Pacific North West from land to the Salish Sea, capturing an inspiring story of extraordinary people fighting to save an extraordinary species. 

 

The hosts met on Saturna Island, BC, in the Summer of 2017.  Gloria was monitoring the Southern Resident Killer Whales and Elena was filming a short video series for a wildlife clothing brand.  After witnessing the ecological crisis first hand, Gloria and Elena joined forces to lead this documentary and race coextinction.

Coextinction Logo Full Colour.png
 
THE SERIES

The series connects the viewer to the Southern Resident Killer Whale, wild salmon, and the Salish Sea. It uncovers the truths behind why this iconic species is on the brink of extinction, and inspires the public to come together to take action.

 

Coextinction presents a powerful story and an immersive journey that aims to forever change how we see ourselves as  interconnected with all life on Earth.

02

THE CHARACTERS

Join us as we sail through the Broughton Archipelago with Alexandra Morton, get a lesson in free diving with salmon from Eiko Jones, and stroll the beach with Cristina Mittermeier.

Coextinction is a multi-part series that features a wide selection of fascinating and vibrant characters. From prominent influencers to activists to political stakeholders - each character provides invaluable insights into this evolving coastal story. 

 

03

KILLER WHALES

The Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW), composed of three different pods (J, K, and L), are a unique sub-species of orca with their own culture, language, and diet.

 

The Southern Residents eat only salmon, mostly Chinook (King) salmon. They live in a matriarchal society where families form sub-pods centred around older females, usually grandmothers or great-grandmothers. The orcas (both female and male) travel with their mothers even after they are fully grown and will stay with their mothers for life.

 
KILLER WHALES

Each Southern Resident pod uses a specific dialect of calls (sounds) to communicate. The calls used by the Southern Resident community are unique and unlike the calls used by any other community of killer whales in the world.

 

The Salish Sea is where you will often see The Southern Resident Killer Whales from Spring through Fall - it's their home. The Salish Sea includes the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the Strait of Georgia, Puget Sound, and all their connecting channels and adjoining waters. It also includes the waters around and between the San Juan Islands in the U.S. State of Washington and the Gulf Islands of British Columbia, Canada.

"I'm not going to count them
to zero, at least not quietly" 

- Ken Balcomb 

SINCE THE MAKING OF COEXTINCTION BEGAN, ONE BY ONE, SOUTHERN RESIDENTS HAVE BEEN DISAPPEARING

J52: Sonic

L92: Crewser

K13: Skagit

K25: Scoter

(son of Skagit)

J17: Princess Angeline

KILLER WHALES

J50: Scarlet

2014-2018

J50's dorsal fin is modelled in the Coextinction logo. A resilient and playful orca before her death, Scarlet represented hope to many.

J35's Calf

Born & Died in 2018

It's what was more than 3 years since the SRKWs had a successful pregnancy. In an act of what scientists believe was grief, this deceased calf was carried by its mother for 17 days.

04

THE ISSUES

The Salish Sea is one of the planet's most celebrated and beloved ecosystems. But beneath the surface, lies the grim reality that its future, and the survival of the Southern Resident Killer Whale species, is under threat. Every day, environmental issues such as declining in salmon stocks, climate change, dams, increasing vessel traffic, pipelines and pollutants, are taking a toll.

 

Click the images below to learn more about how each issue impacts the Salish Sea and the Southern Resident Killer Whale.

 
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You can reach the team at the following address:

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Coextinction Film, 2019   |  Press  |  Donations not tax-deductible  |  Web design by Elena Jean